Pond Health

EPA Cyano Project

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2015 Bearcamp Pond VLAP Report

http://cyanos.org/cyanoscope/

Water Level

Wildlife in and around the pond, depend upon it for a healthy and enduring habitat. The water quality of the pond and water levels are closely related.   The dam, like most small dams in New Hampshire is privately owned, operated, and maintained. The owners strive to use consistent measures to raise and lower the boards each year in accordance with NH-DES Dam Bureau guidelines.  These guidelines recommend surveillance and expertise for small dam owners in controlling water levels, so that board removal (draw down) and replacement is based on prevailing conditions, e.g., excessive rain or lack of precipitation.  Observations and feedback from property owners around the pond are also important sources of surveillance. More information links on this topic are listed below.

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/nongame/documents/appendixb-warmwaterlakesponds.pdf

nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/dam/categories/overview.htm

NHDES Dam Bureau
29 Hazen Drive; PO Box 95
Concord, NH 03302-0095
(603) 271-3406
(603) 271-6120 (fax)
damsafety@des.nh.gov

Information about Lake Drawdown for Aquatic Plant Control is on this Environmental Fact Sheet published by DES:  http://des.nh.gov/organization/commissioner/pip/factsheets/bb/documents/bb-12.pdf


Wildlife

Loon Preservation Committee: http://www.loon.org/

Dam good! Beavers may restore imperiled streams, fish populations

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160708144916.htm

Beavers bring environmental benefits

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160216143059.htm

Beavers restore dead wood in boreal forests

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151123101854.htm

Beavers take a chunk out of nitrogen in Northeast rivers

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151021144706.htm